Agriculture The sorrel of Guinea, Hibiscus sabdariffa

Agriculture: Sorrel of Guinea

Agriculture sorrel of Guinea. The sorrel of Guinea, still known under the name of roselle is a herbaceous plant belonging to the family of Malvaceae. In West Africa, the colored chalice of the roselle is used to make a refreshing drink called bissap, particularly in Côte d’Ivoire. The scientific name of this plant whose leaves are eaten as vegetables, is Hibiscus sabdariffa.

The plant and its characteristics The sorrel of Guinea is a tropical plant, whose area of ​​origin is West Africa. Its mature size varies between 2 and 2.5 m. Its leaves have between 3 and 5 lobes. Flowers, meanwhile, a diameter generally between 8 and 10 cm. These flowers have a corolla whose petals have a red base. The chalice has a bright red color. The fruits of the roselle reach maturity after 6 months.

Agriculture: The plant and its characteristics sorrel of Guinea

The sorrel of Guinea is a tropical plant, whose area of ​​origin is West Africa. Its mature size varies between 2 and 2.5 m. Its leaves have between 3 and 5 lobes. Flowers, meanwhile, a diameter generally between 8 and 10 cm. These flowers have a corolla whose petals have a red base. The chalice has a bright red color. The fruits of the roselle reach maturity after 6 months.

Agriculture: Consumption of sorrel of Guinea

In some areas the sorrel of Guinea is cultivated for its stem from which one extracts a fiber similar to jute. The boiled leaves of the plant are eaten by different peoples. They are part of the accompaniment of Tchep Senegalese specialty rice . The dried colored chalices are exported to Germany and the United States where they serve as food coloring. In West Africa and Mexico, these sepals are used to make a drink. They are also used to make tea in some areas. Diuretic and laxative properties are also attributed to these sepals. They are thus used in the traditional pharmacopoeia for the treatment of various ailments such as water retention. They are also used to treat high blood pressure. On the nutritional side, the infusion of the sepals is rich in anthocyanins, vitamin C, citric acid and malic acid.

Agriculture: Cultivation of sorrel of Guinea

Roselle likes humus soils and well drained. She also likes sunny areas.

Agriculture: sorrel of Guinea Fertilization of soils and sowing

A supply of compost or manure must be made during the preparation of the soil. The supply of mineral fertilizers is only useful on very poor soils.

Two modes of propagation can be used: sowing and cuttings . Whatever option is chosen, a distance of 80 cm between plants must be respected. For successful seeding, Guinea-marbled sorrel seeds are covered with a thin layer of soil. Because of the hardness of the seeds, a 24-hour dipping is recommended to ensure homogenous germination.

Agriculture: sorrel of Guinea Harvest

The leaves can be harvested as soon as the plants have reached a sufficient size. This harvest will be done according to the needs. It will however be necessary to wait for the ripening of the fruits to harvest the sepals

Agriculture: sorrel of Guinea Diseases and pests

The plant is unlikely to diseases. However, it is attacked by some pests, including aphids and red spiders.

 

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